Category: personal

Dungeons and Dragons: New Commons Project Nomination

Around two years ago, the university where I work was awarded a grant to start something we called the New Commons Project. I wrote about this a while ago, but if you’ve forgotten, it’s an effort to select works that are important to us today for a variety of reasons. For example, finalists so far have been everything from the FEDCO Seed Catalog to the Canoe to Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony to The Wire to The Simpsons to Persuasion. Tons of variety, with each work nominated by a person in Maine.

Finalists each get a month of programming here at UMF, with guest speakers and events and lectures to discuss why the work is important. I’ve nominated a few things over the space of the last while (True Grit, Arrested Development, and Libraries themselves), but I really wanted to put something together that would push the envelope in terms of nomination videos. I wanted something that would be fun to watch. Something along the lines of a lot of the videos I enjoy watching online that combine humor, media, and thinking in one.

Six months ago, I decided a nomination for Dungeons and Dragons would be perfect for this. I wrote a script for the video, and I even photoshopped some pictures of the faculty members involved in running the program, but after that, I just ran out of time. I’ve made enough videos to know how much work can go into making one, and I just didn’t have it in me to get over that final hump of sitting down and getting it done.

The deadline is March 15th, however, so I finally decided that needed to change. I recorded the narrative and pushed myself to complete the thing. It wasn’t all smooth sailing. For one thing, I discovered that the script I’d recorded was really bland and boring. When I’d recorded it, I thought I was reading in an interesting tone and that it would be fine, but when I played it back, it just sounded like snoozeville. So I rerecorded it, this time trying to push things over the top. Honestly, I felt like an idiot, reading it in that tone. Like I was doing way too much. But when I played it back, it sounded much better. Lesson learned. To make things really interesting, I need a ton more animation in my voice.

From there, I needed to figure out how to import movie clips and GIFs into my video. Movie clips could be done pretty easily with a Chrome add-on called Steam Video Downloader. (It doesn’t play nice with YouTube, but it’s great with Vimeo.) Then I taught myself how to capture video on my screen with QuickTime Player. Once that was done, I was off and running.

In the end, I’m quite happy with how it turned out. It’s a great mashup of all sorts of things that could have been good nominations on their own, but it makes my argument well: picking Dungeons and Dragons essentially picks a ton of works that it was influenced by and has influenced in turn. I would love to see the programming that would come from a D&D selection. Crossing my fingers that it will happen.

Also, now that I’ve done the video and know what goes into it, I’m tempted to try my hand at a few more. I’d like to do some video essays around different topics. We’ll see if that ever comes together, though. It took me forever just to do this one . . .

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Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

1997: My Peak Valentine’s Day Celebration

I’m a fairly well established public disdainer of Valentine’s Day. But as I was sitting here in the lead up to the big day this year, I was thinking back on the various ways I have celebrated it over the years. When Denisa and I were dating, I made her a card with the picture of a smiling cartoon pig on the front. It said, “This Valentine’s Day, Porky hopes,” and then you opened the card and saw the message “You have a better day than he did.” This was accompanied by a picture of the same pig’s head on a plate, with Xs for eyes. What do you think? Etsy-worthy? But as I traipsed down memory lane, it became clear that the year I did the most for Valentine’s Day had to be 1997. I was 18 in my freshman year at BYU.

At the time, I was living in Deseret Towers, these six story monstrosities that were at the north end of campus. (They’ve since been torn down and replaced with much more aesthetically pleasing buildings. DT had blue lunch trays outside the windows. It’s hard to go anywhere but up when your baseline is “blue lunch trays.”) At the time, I was also dating Kristi Strong who happened to be the roommate of my best friend, Sue Stone. In hindsight, being best friends with your girlfriend’s roommate is not exactly the recipe for a smooth and conflict-free lifestyle, but remember. I was 18.*

Anyway. That Valentines Day, I got both Kristi and Sue a present. For Kristi, I gave her a stuffed teddy bear. Except I tied a noose for it and hung it in her closet. (“Tone deaf” is a very good way to sum up 18-year-old Bryce, I think. He was also a great deal more sheltered than he had any clue.) For Sue, I gave her the Dover thrift edition of Taming of the Shrew. (Both cheap and tacky. I was a treat.) Sue got me what remains my favorite Valentine’s gift ever. She worked at the BYU flower shop, and she hated Valentine’s Day for a much more straightforward reason: it was a day that she was insanely busy as she put together roses and bouquets and corsages for dances, etc. She gave me a dozen dozen red roses. Except they were just the stems, because she’d lopped off the actual roses to make all those corsages. I thought it was perfect.

Not to be outdone, I also wrote a sonnet for Sue. Before any of you accuse me of being even more idiotic than I was (a sonnet for the best friend, and not for the girlfriend? Did I have a death wish?), I’d already written one for Kristi. And yes, it’s horrible, and no, I won’t share it with you, but yes, I still have a copy, because I’m a digital packrat. And actually, I’d already written one for Sue (also terrible, having just re-read it), but she’d challenged me to write a sonnet that was as insulting as possible.

I’m sure some of you are reading that and realizing what a bad idea it was to ask 18-year-old Bryce to write an insulting sonnet. But remember, 18-year-old Bryce didn’t really have brakes on his train.

Challenge accepted.

So without further ado, here’s the end result I came up with:

Dear Sue,
Did you know that you really piss me off
With your incessantly annoying whine?
At one mere sonnet you can only scoff–
Do you think that I worship at your shrine?
For me to waste my time to write just one
For an insipid little pest like you
Is just enough for me to want a gun
To put an end to nauseating Sue.
But here I sit, composing once again,
This time allowing truth to see the light
For now I have good cause to use a pen:
I gave you praise, but you–you gave me slight.
The next time that I see your face I’ll snap:
In my opinion you’re a piece of crap!

There you go, folks. I somehow managed to even tie in another threat to physically harm/kill a woman. Way to go, 18-year-old me! (As a side note, it’s always interesting to see how, while we might think we haven’t changed that much over the years, and that we’ve always been level-headed and practically perfect in every way, when we’re forced to look at who we were, what we said and did, and how we did it, the truth doesn’t always line up with how we remember it . . .)

In any case, that’s about all the time for self deprecation I’ve got today. I don’t still hate Valentine’s Day with quite the same gusto that I once did, but I also still don’t have any pink or red decorations up. There are no candy hearts in my house. And Denisa and I won’t be exchanging gifts or having a candlelit dinner. On the other hand, I’m also not making fun of suicide and using veiled death threats to woo women any more.

Progress?

*This was also the year I went on three dates in one evening. Which, again, was not the wisest choice, since I had to come up with reasons to end one date so that I could make my next date in time, and even I was sane enough to know telling your current date you had to go date another girl was just asking for trouble. And while you might be able to get away with that once in one night, you’re really spitting in the face of fate to try it twice. And if that doesn’t sum up who I was at 18, then you’ll be relieved to hear I also broke the leg of not one, but *two* girls. Who were roommates. Apparently I had a thing for roommates and destruction.**

**Because I’m sure you’re going to ask how it is I, a generally non-violent person, ended up breaking the legs of two young women, allow me to elucidate. The first happened on a swing dancing date. It was my first time, and my date (Jessica Franciose) and I were learning various moves. Jess was a much more adventurous dancer than I was, but I liked her a lot, and so I was pretending to be more daring than I had any right. We were working on this one move where I would grab her across her stomach and then flip her in a somersault over my arm. (Clearly I didn’t yet have back issues at age 18.) We had just gotten to the point where we felt like we could do it pretty well, so we decided to show off to her friends. It went off without a hitch . . . until she landed on my foot instead of the floor. My foot was fine, but she fell, badly hurting her leg in the process.*** We found out the next day that she had a hairline fracture in that leg.

***Because Jess was an awesome person (and still is, I’m sure), she insisted I keep dancing without her while she walked off the pain. So I then danced with her roommate, Tiffany Ensign. At this point, I had come to the sound conclusion that perhaps the world wasn’t ready for a Bryce who flipped girls in somersaults over his arm, so we tried out simpler moves. There was this one where you held onto each other’s hands and spun in circle, offsetting each other’s weight in a perfect balance. Whee! That seemed pretty tame, so we tried that. It all went well for the first turn or two, but then I maybe turned a bit too fast. It’s a blur. All I know is that Tiff’s legs kicked out from under her, and instead of us twirling around in a happy little dance move, I was holding onto her hands while she stared at me in wide-eyed terror as I swung her around in a move closer to pro-wrestling than dancing. She was pretty much in the superman pose, horizontal to the floor. I had no idea what to do, so . . . I kept spinning. Unbeknownst to me, there was another couple happily dancing behind me. I used my new dance partner to literally sweep the girl behind me off her feet. She went flying into the air. I was shocked, and in my shock, I let go of Tiff. She went sailing off in the other direction, leaving me staring at the other girl’s date . . . I didn’t go swing dancing very often after that.****

****Keen-eyed readers will note that I didn’t actually break Tiffany’s leg in that story. That’s because it was a different girl whose leg I broke. One of Jess’s other roommates, whose name escapes me at the moment. Tracy, maybe? We’ll go with that. In any case, Tracy came into their apartment one day wearing a T-shirt with cow spots on it. I, in my 18-year-old naïveté, cheerfully blurted out the obvious: “You look like a cow!” Yes, in hindsight, telling a young woman that she looked like a cow was not, perhaps, the wisest move for a lone young man in an apartment full of girls, but I didn’t yet have the same experience with tact that I hope I have today. In any case, I got in no small amount of hot water over that statement, and Tracy didn’t forget it. Days or weeks later, I was sitting on that same couch in that same apartment, minding my own business, when Tracy took a glass of water and dumped it over my head. Vengeance for the cow comment. Anyone who knows me well, though, knows that while I’m generally cheerful and polite, I also come with a few basic instructions. First, never feed me after midnight. Second, limit my exposure to sunlight. But the most important is to never ever get me wet. You know how Bruce Banner hulks out when he gets angry? I get sort of the same look in my eyes when someone purposefully dumps a glass of water over my head. I leapt from the couch and raced after Tracy, who had the good sense to run away from me as fast as she could. This being BYU, there was a hard rule about being over at a girl’s apartment: no men in the bedroom. If Tracy could make it to her bedroom, she would be safe. (Safe from what, I’m still not sure. I have no idea what I was planning to do if I caught her. My mind wasn’t thinking that clearly.) In any case, she darted away from me, but she also discovered that a wet Bryce is a fast Bryce. I caught up to her just as she was turning into her room. To stop her, I grabbed at her t-shirt. What I didn’t know is that she was wearing a sports bra. I didn’t just get her t-shirt with my grab: I got a good hold on the back of her sports bra, too. When she turned, she didn’t compensate for me holding onto her clothes so tightly, and her turn ended up being way faster and tighter than she expected. Instead of making it into her room, she slammed into the doorframe. And broke her leg. Tracy, I’m very very sorry.*****

*****This is all making me look much worse than I hope I actually was in my freshman year of college. I’m proud to say I’ve never broken a woman’s leg since, though I did break my son’s leg when he was two.****** I also stopped dating roommates of my best friends, and I never went on three dates in one evening again.

******Okay. I can’t just leave that there, because now I sound abusive. I broke Tomas’s leg when the two of us went down a spiral slide on a playground. His leg got caught under 230 pounds of Bryce. And that’s how I learned that you’re never supposed to go down a spiral slide with a toddler. You think you’re being more careful by going with them. You’re actually just increasing the odds that they break something.

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Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Midlife Crisis?

Back on New Years Eve for our family’s party, we all looked back at what we’d done the past decade and where we thought we’d be a decade from now. We started with MC, who hadn’t even been here for the whole decade. “Coming into existence” is a pretty big accomplishment, and by the end of the next decade, she’ll be dating and in high school. DC went from 1 to 11 (take that, Spinal Tap!), and she’ll be in college, possibly returned from a mission by the end of this next decade. Tomas was in elementary school, and now he’s a sophomore. Within a decade he’ll be doing all sorts of huge things. College. Mission. Maybe even married. He could be a father by the end of the decade.

Then we came to me. I got a fair bit done this last decade, no doubt. Several promotions. MLA President. Published my first novel (and my second!). There was lots to look back on and feel good about. When I turned my focus on what lay ahead, however . . .

“Ten years from now, I think I’ll be doing pretty much what I’m doing now. Director of the library. Writing books on the side. And that’s about it.”

Somehow it felt pretty depressing to say that, and it’s a statement that’s stuck with me ever since we discussed it. On the one hand, it’s nothing to be too upset about. I love my life, and I think I’ve got a great thing going out here in Maine. But on the other hand, it all feels so . . . set. Like my kids are going to be out doing interesting exciting things, and I’m just going to Groundhog Day my way through life. I love the movie, but the thought of living it for the next ten years isn’t the rosiest thought I’ve had recently.

This isn’t supposed to be a complainy post. But at the same time, I guess I can relate in many ways to what people feel when they hit their midlife crisis. You go from all sorts of exciting things. Big, huge changes. And then it’s just keep on trucking, year after year. You start to look at things you could do to really shake things up. Get a different job? Switch career paths? Go live in a yurt?

For the last several months, I’ve just felt a bit at sea whenever I’ve had downtime and nothing to think about. I’ve felt like a lot of what I’ve been doing is just . . . stuff I’ve done before. I’ve tried to figure out why that is. Am I burned out? Depressed? I don’t have any real answers, other than this observation about remembering that New Years Eve discussion.

I like to challenge myself. I feel best when I’m actively involved solving problems. I like playing games that make me think. I’d rather play a new game with a new ruleset to figure out than to play a game I’ve played time and time again. When I’m writing, I write books that are significantly different from books I’ve written before, each time. When I get to the point that I feel like I know what’s coming and how to handle it too well, I can get bored and lose interest. That’s not a good thing, but it’s something I know about myself.

The trick for me, then, is to find new ways to reach. I don’t feel like the same old same old as a writer. I feel like there are still many ways I can become better and improve. How do I take that same feeling and apply it in other areas of my life? At work, or at home, or with my hobbies. I tend to think if I set good goals, I can get over this speed bump, but some of the problem is at times I don’t even really feel like meeting my goals. (That’s very out of character for me.)

I think the biggest helpful thought I’ve had in dealing with this right now is something I’ve learned writing books. The middle is always the hardest part of just about anything. Beginnings are full of discovery and excitement. Endings are thrilling and flashy. But the middle of a story is what makes or breaks a book. You get through that easy beginning and find out just what sort of a book you’re dealing with. And in order to have a flashy ending, it’s key that the middle is all done just right. You don’t get an emotional oomph at the end without a whole ton of work in that middle. Actually writing the middle is really tough, though. It’s hard to tell where you are at times. Hard to feel like you’re making progress. But if you bear down and push forward, you hit a point where it all starts popping again.

That’s me right now. I see no reason to make any wild changes. Don’t look to see me riding a Harley any time soon, for instance. But I wanted to try and get my thoughts down, and I’d be curious to hear what other people have experienced like this, and how they handled it. Thanks for reading!

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Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Updating Your Life

I’m not a huge fan of updates. Well, maybe that’s not entirely true. I’m a fan of having updated, but I don’t like the actual updating process itself. Take computers, for example. I’m a big fan of having all the new bells and whistles that come with an update. Security fixes are great to have, and I realize how necessary they are. But the actual updating process? It feels like every day my computer is telling me it needs to update. Some of those updates just take a minute or two. Some of them end up taking an hour or more. When I have other things I need to be doing, I don’t feel like I have time to just sit around watching my computer be useless for an hour plus.

So each time that “Updates are ready for your computer” alert shows up, it takes me all of five seconds to click “remind me tomorrow,” as if by tomorrow I’m magically going to see that alert and think, “Oh boy! I get to update my computer today!” Each day, I kick the can one day farther down the road, which probably goes a fair way toward explaining why, when I finally give in and agree to the updates, it takes so long for those updates to run their course.

My question to myself today is: do I do the same thing in my life? Sometimes there are things going on that I know I need to work on. Chores that need doing. Bad habits I’ve slipped into, and good habits I’ve slipped out of. I’ll get a periodic reminder of the need to update my life, but typically I feel so busy, I dismiss the reminder. “I don’t have time for that.” “It’s not that important.” And so I kick the can down the road and try not to think of it.

Until inevitably it all spirals out of control to the point where I feel like I absolutely must work on things, and by then, there’s so much to work on, it can be overwhelming. This applies to everything from personal relationships to weight to clutter around the house to just about anything else.

Let’s face it: keeping things in order takes hard work. There always feels like there’s something vital we need to get done this instant, and so it’s really tempting to shove off the things that don’t feel as immediate. But in the grand scheme of things, those things that don’t feel as immediate often end up helping us get done the things that feel so vital. (That’s a pretty densely packed sentence. Sorry.)

What’s more, for me, each one of those “I’ll do this later” decisions ends up only adding to my stress levels. When I get that “Your computer needs updating” message and ignore it, that reminder doesn’t just disappear into the ether. It’s still loitering around in the back of my mind, reminding me there’s another thing I need to take care of, just like the piles on my dresser remind me I need to clean them each time I glance at my dresser. Putting off little decisions to later isn’t a big deal, but put off enough of them, and they can snowball into a general feeling of being overwhelmed.

So I know (in theory) that I should do the updates to my life as they arise. I should watch what I eat. Spend time with each of the kids. Focus on decluttering something each day. I have a vision of what my life could be like if I just did everything the way I planned to. The reality is a pretty stark contrast to that ideal, though. I’d like to think I’m getting better at it over the years, but sometimes I wonder if that’s really the case.

I don’t have any lifehacks for you today. No grand approaches to getting things actually “updated.” All I’ve got is the concept. The reminder that taking that time when it comes is better than putting it off. Just because something’s not going to light on fire in the next five minutes doesn’t make it less important if you keep in mind that the fire it might light could take you hours, days, or weeks to put out.

Anyway. I’m off to take my Prius into the shop. It has a safety recall on it that I’ve been putting off far too long. Maybe I’ll update my computer while I’m in the waiting room . . .

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Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Trolling in 2020

I used to have a theory about online interactions. If people identified who they were, then they were much less likely to behave poorly online. Facebook’s open nature, with people clearly being identified, would tamp down the tendency of people to turn into trolls.

Maybe that was true at some point in the past. It doesn’t seem to be true today.

Today, I see people much more comfortable to say whatever pops into their head, with the only limiting factor (for most bad comments) seeming to be the likelihood of people ever meeting in real life. Facebook is simply so large, and some of the comment chains so big, that I believe people feel comfortably anonymous to the point that having their actual identity attached to a comment is no longer a deterrent.

Case in point: a friend’s brother posted a video of him and his wife announcing their adoption of two children. It’s been quite a popular post, with the video getting millions of views. He’s got Crouzon Syndrome, which left his face somewhat deformed. While many of the comments were positive, some people took jabs at his appearance. Other people then took even worse jabs at the people who had made the original jabs. In my book, both are clearly out of line.

First off, making snide remarks about how someone looks is so juvenile, I don’t think it deserves a response. If people have managed to limp through life deluding themselves into thinking they’re funny or justified by doing this, that says much more about who they are themselves than it does about who they’re trying to make fun of. I’m sure people do this to other people in person as well, because some people are just horrendous. It still makes me sad. (Especially since barbed comments have a way of sticking with us for far longer than compliments. I could get 100 good reviews of a book. The one that’ll stick with me is the one that hated it, however. Because we all suffer from impostor syndrome to one extent or another. We’re all worried we’re not nearly “with it” as other people think, and those mean comments (we then worry) are just what everyone’s actually thinking. It’s not true, but it’s hard to get your subconscious to believe that . . .)

But then there’s this mob mentality that comes out as soon as someone steps out of line and says something mean or out of place. It’s like people take any rude or out of place remark as justification to be as mean and spiteful as they want to be. It happens all the time on Twitter. It happens when people write things years ago that might have made sense at the time, but no longer are seen in the same light. Any straying from the accepted, and the mob shows up with torches and pitchforks, ready to kill the beast.

Do some of those original trolls “deserve” the treatment they get? I suppose you could argue they do, though I’d say certainly not to the extent that’s dished out on them. Every time this sort of back and forth happens, I think it gets worse. Each side begins to feel more and more justified saying mean, spiteful things to the other. And because all of it’s happening online between people who almost certainly will never meet in person, it’s only that much worse.

When you consider that some of these “people” might be nothing more than sock puppets created to further split a divided nation apart, you begin to see how easily manipulated this whole approach is.

So what can we do about it? I have a few suggestions.

  1. Don’t have conversations with strangers online. Don’t make or read comments about news stories or social media posts, unless they’re about posts made or shared by your actual friends. If a friend links to a story, I’ll comment in their individual linked post, but I won’t comment or read any of the comments in the original post it links to, if that makes sense.
  2. If you have something extensive to say, make your own post. Dealing with the fallout of back and forth bickering on your social media wall can be really draining, and it’s unfair to stick that all on someone else. You get to dip in and out of another person’s feed at will. They don’t get that luxury.
  3. Don’t feed the trolls. If someone shows up and makes a snide remark to you, let it go. Or do what I do, and just post a GIF of someone doing an eye roll. Usually that’s all those comments are worth.
  4. Delete comments that are out of line on your own wall. It’s your feed. Weed it. If you wouldn’t tolerate someone saying something in person, don’t let them get away with it online. Not when it’s on your own wall. (When it’s on their wall, see my next comment.)
  5. If I find my interactions with a person are being negatively affected by the way they behave and speak on social media, I hide that person. I don’t unfriend them, I just remove their ability to continue to damage our relationship. I know this one might be unpopular with some. (They’re showing they’re a terrible person. Why would I still be friends with them?!?) I have only unfriended someone once, and that was because they continued to pepper my wall with comments I vehemently disagreed with, even after I had hidden them. My hope is people I’ve hidden will somehow come around by reading my posts. Unfriending them shuts off that possibility. Just call me a cockeyed optimist.

These rules have helped me stay sane on Facebook. I’m not nearly as active on Twitter or Instagram, so I have no idea how well they’d transition to those platforms. But I do know you need to come up with something that works for you, whatever it is. Something that helps guide you through what can at times be tricky situations to maneuver. What rules have some of you developed? I’d be interested in different approaches.

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Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

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