Category: politics

Did I Change More, or Did the Republican Party?

A friend asked me to sum up my thoughts on being registered as a Republican after reading my post on the primaries yesterday. My initial reaction was short: “A remnant of an earlier Bryce and an earlier Republican Party. Feels like both the Party and I have each moved in different directions in the past decade. Hard for me to tell who moved more.” But I’ve continued to think about the question, and I decided it warranted a full post. (Even though that makes for two political posts in a row. Sorry.)

I was most definitely raised Republican. My family was Republican, and my church was (and continues to be) dominated by Republicans. When I was old enough to start actually paying attention to politics (around seventh or eighth grade, as I recall), I would listen to Rush Limbaugh and agree with pretty much everything he said. I even got his book, The Way Things Ought to Be. Of course, I also didn’t really know anything other than Republicanism. (That I was aware of, at least.) Back then, Democrats were all misguided or nefarious. (I did and said a lot of things back then that I still feel very sorry about to this day. Jokes I made. Casual comments I tossed off here and there, without even realizing just how hurtful they could be. I’m honestly surprised some of my high school friends are still friends with me, and I’m thankful they managed to overlook some of my more egregious character flaws back then.)

I went to school at BYU, in a Republican-dominated state, surrounded by a Republican-dominated student body. Ironically, that’s when I first began to start questioning the assumptions I’d made my entire life. Having grown up on the East coast, I had been surrounded by people who believed different things than I did and came from different backgrounds. True, I just recognized those differences in some areas, like religion and race, but I still saw that there were differences, and that those differences didn’t make those people better or worse than anyone else. I loved a lot of things about BYU (and continue to love it), but one thing I was never a fan of was how uniform the student body could be. I felt like so many people were cookie cutter twins, and I realized that some of the thoughts and opinions I had were different than what everyone else had. My views on religion, for example, were less by-the-book.

(It’s a simple example, but it serves to illustrate my point: at the time, the church’s stance on R-rated movies was “don’t see any of them.” I didn’t like that stance, and disagreed with it for a number of reasons I won’t go into here. But that disagreement definitely marked me as Other on BYU’s campus. Once you’ve been marked as Other, you begin to realize that Other isn’t the same thing as “Bad.”)

Then I went on my mission to Germany. For two years, I was talking and listening to people from all walks of life. I talked with former and current Communists. Former Nazis. I met current skinheads. I made friends with a ton of refugees from Ghana and Sierra Leone. And these weren’t casual conversations. I would go up to people and start talking religion. If there’s a way to find out what people really think about life, try talking to complete strangers about a real hot button topic, day in, day out, for two years. This didn’t cause me to lose my faith. (It actually strengthened it, as I began to question things and figure things out for myself, until I was a member of my religion not because I was raised that way, but because I honestly believed in it.)

In any case, I came home even more Other than I had left. I know it sounds strange to say that a straight, white, Latter-day Saint would feel Other when he was surrounded by other straight, white, Latter-day Saints, but I believe there are many different ways to be Other. Sometimes, when almost everyone is so similar, “Other” begins to be measured in much smaller gradations.

Still, I was staunchly Republican. I voted for George W, and I thought it was divine intervention that made it so that he won the election in 2000, especially after 9/11 happened. I felt like Bush led the country perfectly through that, and I didn’t understand why anyone could see it any other way.

In 2007, I moved to Maine. Still Republican, though with a streak of rebelliousness that anyone else would call mild-mannered, but which had continued to set me apart in Utah. In Maine, of course, I felt like an arch-conservative. Like that liberal streak in me was only there in comparison to other conservatives. (True.) I participated in the local caucus process, rubbing elbows with other staunch Republicans, and it was all fine and good. I had a Mitt Romney sign in my yard in 2008.

Then John McCain picked Sarah Palin as his running mate.

I know it seems like such a silly thing to have such a big impact on me, politically speaking, but the more Sarah Palin spoke, the more disillusioned I became with her, and by proxy, with McCain’s decision to have her be his running mate. In the end, I voted for Obama, mainly because of that one decision. Part of it was that Palin presented the world in such stark terms, and that those terms seemed so . . . uninformed. Part of it was that in my short time in Maine, I’d already begun to meet many people who weren’t just sort of different from me. They were very different. LGBTQ+, different religions, different races (even in Maine), different politics, different socio-economic statuses. To hear Republicans paint some of these groups with so broad a brush felt wrong to me. It was forcing a black and white worldview on a situation that was anything but.

Four years went by. I heard many Republicans bemoan Obama as being terrible, even though I didn’t see anything that wrong with what he’d been doing. A different approach, perhaps, but I was more disillusioned with how little the rest of government seemed to get done. I continued to be dissatisfied with the way Republicans labeled other groups. It reminded me too much of the sort of ideology I’d seen skinheads espouse in Germany, and it made me very uncomfortable.

Still, when Mitt won the nomination, I voted for him. I believed he was a better person than how he was portrayed, and I thought he would do a great job as President. (Honestly, I still do. Though my criteria for “great job as President” has changed quite a bit over the Trump administration.) I wasn’t crushed when Obama won again, though. The last four years hadn’t been terrible, and I thought he’d gotten some good things accomplished. I knew many people who were desperate for good health care, for example, and I was happy that something was being done to get them access to it.

I met other politicians in the higher ranks of leadership. I met all of Maine’s Congresspeople. And Republicans began to stonewall just about anything that would come up for debate. I was very unhappy with their tactics, disappointed that they would dismiss as a matter of rule anything the Democrats came up with. Those four years of Obama’s second term made me like the Republicans less and less.

Cue the 2016 election. Clinton was far from my first choice. I had a deep-seated dislike of the Clintons that stretched back to my Limbaugh-loving days as a high schooler. I thought they were generally dishonest, and I had deep reservations about bringing them back to the White House. But the Republicans somehow managed to nominate Trump, and my opinion of him is well documented.

I voted for Clinton. It wasn’t even a contest in my mind.

Since then, my opinion of Republicans has fallen even further. The way they’ve thrown their values out the window in order to stay in power has nauseated me. All of that’s easy enough to trace on my blog, so I don’t need to go into details.

But let’s go over the main hot-button issues that separate the two parties today. (The non-Trumpian ones, at least):

  • Health Care: I believe our health care system is broken. It’s far too expensive, and it relies almost wholly on insurance. I would like to see affordable options for everyone. Do I want the whole thing socialized? Not necessarily. I just want someone to be able to be unemployed and still be able to get treated if they get cancer. I’m so sad every time I see another GoFundMe set up to help people pay for medical treatment. That’s a failure as a country to deliver basic care to all its citizens. The Affordable Care Act was a step in the right direction. I hoped it would be the first of many.
  • Gun Control: Again, this is something I have documented on my blog. I am 100% in favor of gun control.
  • Abortion: In general, I’m against abortion. But I believe there should be exceptions made for certain cases (rape, health of the mother/child, incest), and I’m not in favor of any laws that don’t allow for those exceptions. If the choice is “totally legal unrestricted” or “completely banned,” I will go with the first.
  • War on Terror: I’m very disturbed by our country’s escalating use of drones to carry out assaults around the globe. The latest strike on the Iranian general was just the next step in this trend. I don’t like it. Overall, I think we’re spending too much on defense, but ironically, I think we need to keep spending that much on defense because we’re being such an international menace to so many.
  • Immigration: The wall is a terrible idea. Closing our borders to so many is a terrible idea. The awful rhetoric being used against immigrants is despicable. The camps we’re stuffing refugees into are wrong on so many levels. Again, this harkens back to the days I spent befriending people in refugee camps in Germany. When you personally know people in these situations, it becomes much harder to ignore the plight of strangers in the same spot. You can’t dismiss individuals the same way you can dismiss labels.
  • LGBTQ+: Now having known many more people who identify on LGBTQ+ issues, it’s increasingly difficult for me to justify laws that discriminate against them. It’s the same principle as the immigration question, for me.
  • Environmentalism/Climate Change: How in the world anyone can continue to staunchly argue Climate Change isn’t real is beyond me. But then, people also believe vaccines cause autism and that the world is flat. People will believe all sorts of things, it seems. I would like to see an approach where we try our best to reduce our impact on the environment. Where we protect it instead of destroy it. Does that mean I’m going to stop flying? No. I’m not to that extreme. But we can do more, and I believe we should.
  • Education: I work at an academic library. I see the difference a good education can make for students. I’m fully in favor of more education and making it affordable.
  • Taxes/Redistribution of Wealth: I believe there’s a huge disparity today between the rich and the poor. The top tax rate is 40% right now. Historically, it’s been as high as 70-90%. I’m not saying it has to go that high again, but I do believe there are ways to pay for the different efforts we need to make to help our citizens have access to basic needs. Some of those ways are “higher taxes.”*

Overall, I find myself in the middle of many different issues. But lately Republicans have been painting things as an either/or situation. That black and white approach to all these issues makes me feel like I have to go with the option that’s more reasonable, and (to me) that’s almost always the one espoused by the Democrats. For example, would I be as staunchly in favor of gun control if some reasonable measures had already been passed? Doubtful.

I feel like the Republicans have shifted to the right by a great degree, and then dug in at that position and said that anything that disagrees with that position is terrible. I am concerned by the reaction of this (to have the Democrats go even stronger to the left), but until Trump can be shooed off the stage, I’m not sure what else can be done.

I have plenty of Democrat friends who think I’m far too conservative on many issues, and plenty of Republican friends who think I’m far too liberal. I tilt to the Democrat side of the aisle right now because of how repugnant I find Republican tactics, but I’d love a centrist approach, where reasonable measures are taken to solve big problems.

So . . . that’s the longer answer to the question. It still doesn’t feel like it’s the whole answer, but at least it gives some overview of where I was and why I am where I am now.

*I get a kick out of the current argument I’m seeing circulated among Republicans who want to support Social Security but say they’re against anything to do with Socialism. “Social Security is paid by the workers. They get out of it what they put into it.” Hogwash. I’m paying Social Security now with little hope that I’ll ever get out of it what I’m putting into it. I know it’s in precarious waters, and you know what? I’m at peace with that. Why? Because retirees need to live too, and me paying Social Security can help them. I pay taxes. Some of those taxes go to help me. Some of them go to help other people. But the thought that Social Security is somehow vastly different than other taxes just doesn’t hold water, in my book.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Who I’m Voting for and Why: 2020 Primary Edition

Another primary election season is upon us. This year, Maine is participating with a primary instead of a caucus for only the third time in its history. (For the record, I much prefer primaries. Let me go and vote and be done with it. I can’t stand the huge time suck that the caucus system always felt like to me. Sorry, people who actually like it.)

Due more to my inherent laziness than anything else, I continue to be a registered Republican. (If anything, I think I’d just unregister as a Republican and not register as anything else. But I have yet to be motivated to do so, because . . . why.) There’s only one option on the Republican ballot, and I would vote for literally anyone or anything other than Donald Trump. (I was trying to think of someone who would have to run against Donald Trump to get me to vote for Trump. Maybe if you had a necromancer bring Hitler or Stalin back to life, and then had one of them run for office, and the only other option was Trump . . . it would be a close call. I’d have to find out if the Republican party was going to back Zombie Hitler or not. Because if they weren’t, then I’d probably vote ZH, simply because I’d have to think he wouldn’t be able to get anything on his agenda passed without support from a major political party. What makes Trump so particularly awful is the way the Republican party has cashed in its values to embrace him. But I digress.)

So I won’t be voting for Trump. (I won’t bother to do a write-in vote, either, since a write-in vote will be counted as a blank vote, and remember: I’m lazy.)

If I were a Democrat, who would I vote for? Elizabeth Warren. Sorry, Bernie Bros and Biden Buds, I like Warren’s approach to things more than either of your candidate’s, and I certainly like her more than Bloomberg. Then again, to anyone making arguments of strategic voting (voting for a particular candidate because you believe the other candidates will lose against Trump), my response to that is a big “meh.” I think you should vote for whom you want to win. “Everyone” said Trump was unelectable. Everyone was wrong. I could see scenarios where a Bernie nomination results in hordes of scare tactics being used to keep Trump in office. I could see scenarios where a Biden win results in a bunch of disillusioned people just not voting at all. There’s a lot of time between November and now. Vote with your heart.

However, I will vote for whomever becomes the Democrat nominee, because I don’t care if we take out the Death Star by shooting an exhaust port right below the main port, or if we take it out by flying the Millennium Falcon right into the heart of the thing and blow it up there. All that matters to me is that Death Star comes out of the sky.

The only other issue on the ballot is an effort to veto the law that removed religious and philosophical loopholes to the requirement to vaccinate your children if they were going to attend public schools. Normally, I’d actually be fine with those loopholes. I respect the right for people to have religious beliefs that are different than mine, and as long as those beliefs don’t cause any serious harm, fine. But because so many people in our country have embraced the anti-vaccination movement, it’s causing our immunity to various diseases to crumble. And most of those people are using the religious/philosophical loophole to get out of the requirement. So . . . this is why we can’t have nice things, folks. I’m definitely voting no on that question.

Whether you agree with me or not, I hope you all go out and vote and participate in the process. Each and every vote matters, and the worst thing we can do is face our voting process each year with apathy. Vote!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Religion in Politics

As the political season ramps up even more(!), I’m already seeing plenty of posts on social media citing religion to back up political beliefs. You’ve got people who cite quotes from the Bible about the importance of independence, or the sanctity of marriage, or the evils of legalized marijuana, or the need to be more compassionate. And when I see these posts, I have a mixed response.

On the one hand, I’m a deeply religious person, and so it’s natural that my politics are influenced by my religious beliefs. On the other hand, I try to avoid making religious arguments, and I admittedly bristle when those arguments are made online for a number of reasons.

First of all, if you make an appeal to religion as a way of “solving” a political issue, you’re only going to further polarize an already polarized topic. If you have people who agree with you, they’re going to nod and give you a solid amen. You might have people who aren’t religious but still agree with you. They’ll likely just go wander off elsewhere, because why bother. If you have people who aren’t religious and don’t agree with you, they’re going to yell at you for bringing something irrelevant into an important conversation. (At which point you get to begin to argue about religion AND politics at the same time.) Finally, you also might have people who are religious but disagree with your conclusion. (In which case you’re back to arguing about religion and politics again.)*

Second, there’s no really good way to interact with a post that uses religion to prove a point. If you critique it based on religious grounds, then you’re called a heretic. If you critique it based on secular grounds, then you’re just a heathen who hasn’t properly been enlightened yet.

Again, I can and do have political beliefs that are influenced by my religion. But do I believe God agrees with those beliefs? To me, that’s what’s happening when these sort of posts are shared online. They’re saying “God wants you to vote against _________” or “God needs you to protect ___________.” And that kind of argument is really tenuous at best.

What if it’s a Muslim making the post? What if it’s a Jew? A Buddhist? If you would dismiss those religious posts as irrelevant, then why post your own version of them? Because your religion is right and theirs is wrong? If that’s the case, then we’re right back to arguing about religion and politics again instead of just politics.

It can feel very cathartic to find a religious quote or argument that really resonates with us, and that’s fine. It’s when we go on and use that quote to try and convince others that things just fall apart for me. Because a religious quote is using an appeal to an ultimate authority to prove your point. It’s saying, “Not only do I think I’m right, but GOD thinks I’m right too. So if you disagree with me, you’re just flat out wrong.”

“But, Bryce,” I anticipate some of you saying. “There are certain ultimate truths out there. Why *shouldn’t* I post something if God is clearly in favor of it or against it? I need to make sure everyone knows they’re wrong.”

To which I respond, “Unless God has decided to make you His ultimate mouthpiece on earth, maybe deciding to speak for Him on social media is a bit premature.”

If actual church leaders aren’t throwing up posts left and right in favor of a candidate or against a position, maybe we could learn a thing or two from that and follow suit. If they *are* putting up those posts, then go ahead and share and like them, I suppose, but don’t expect that post to be the sort of a Mic Drop post online that you want to think it will be.

Generally speaking, I believe there are good people with deeply held religious beliefs on both sides of the aisle. No party has a monopoly on virtue or faith. Almost every single hot button political issue I can think of is a thorny mess of contradictions, with no clear right and wrong answer.

I’m not sure what I think this post is going to accomplish. I fully expect to continue seeing posts from both sides drawing religion into politics. Maybe my best approach to dealing with it would be to just decide not to say anything on any of the posts. Probably safest for me . . .

But if you’re thinking about posting something in this vein, and this post makes you think twice about it, then maybe I’ll have done some good.

*If only we could somehow throw in a divisive sports reference into the same posts. Something like “God said the Yankees need to lead the country against socialism.” Maybe that could make things even more spicy in the Facebook comments.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Green Eggs and Trump

For the past while, I’ve been toying with a Green Eggs and Ham approach to the election this year. Why? Because I’m easily amused, I suppose. And going on the assumption that some of you are easily amused as well, I now present to you:

Green Eggs and Trump

I’m a Chump. I’m a Chump. Chump for Trump.

That Chump-for-Trump! That Chump-for-Trump!

I do not like that Chump-for-Trump!

Would you like to stump for Trump?

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that horse’s rump.

Would you like his trades or wall?

I would not like his trades or wall.

I would not like that man at all.

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that pimple bump.

Should he stay inside the House?

He has such a lovely spouse.

I do not like him in the House.

Who cares about his lovely spouse?

I do not like his trades or wall.

I do not like that man at all.

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that racist lump.

Would you like him, for the Court?

Our judicial last resort!

Not for the Court. No last resort.

Not in the House. Not for his spouse.

I would not like his trades or wall.

I would not like that man at all.

I would not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that rotten grump.

Would you? Could you? For some cash?

Democrats will make us crash!

I would not, could not, for some cash.

You may like him, you will see.

Only he can contain Xi!

He cannot, will not, contain Xi.

Not for some cash! You let me be.

I do not like him, for the Court.

I do not like his golf resort.

I do not like him in the House.

I do not think about his spouse.

I do not like his trades or wall.

I do not like that man at all.

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that garbage dump.

The corps! The corps! The corps! The corps!

Could you, would you, for the corps?

Not for the corps! Not for XI!

Not for cash, Chump! Let me be!

I would not, could not, for the Court.

He will not be my last resort.

I will not like him in the House.

I will not like his trades or wall.

I will not like him in the fall.

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that moral slump.

Say! For health care? For good health care!

Would you, could you, for health care?

I would not, could not, for health care.

Would you, could you, for a war?

I would not, could not, for a war.

Not for health care. Not for the corps.

Not for some cash. Not against Xi.

I do not like him, Chump, you see.

Not in the House. Not for the court.

Not for his spouse. No last resort.

I will not like his trades or wall.

I do not like that man at all!

You do not want to stump for Trump?

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

Could you, would you, for the oil?

I would not, could not for the oil!

WIll you wear this hat tinfoil?

I will not wear that hat tinfoil.

I will not, will not, for the oil.

I will not like him for a war.

Not for health care! Not against Xi!

Not for some cash! You let me be!

I do not like him, for the Court.

He cannot be our last resort.

I will not like him in the House.

I do not think about his spouse.

I do not like his trades or wall.

I do not like that man at all!

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I do not like that Forrest Gump.

You do not like him. So you say.

Try him! Try him! And you may.

Try him and you may, I say.

Chump! If you let me be,

I will try him. You will see.

[Three seconds later]

Nope.

Nope. Nope. Nope. Nope.

Joe Biden or Buttigieg

Either one I won’t begrudge.

Michael Bloomberg has my vote.

Warren is an antidote.

Tulsi Gabbard, Thomas Steyer:

Better than a garbage fire!

Klobuchar or Bernie Sanders

Vote for both! They would be grander.

I would vote for my friend, Daniel.

I’d elect a Cocker Spaniel!

I will not wear that hat tinfoil.

I will not, will not, for the oil.

I will not like him for a war.

Not for health care! Not against Xi!

Not for some cash! You let me be!

I do not like him, for the Court.

He cannot be our last resort.

I will not like him in the House.

I do not think about his spouse.

I do not like his trades or wall.

I do not like that man at all!

I do not like him, Chump-for-Trump.

I’ll never vote for Donald Trump.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

Ranked Choice Voting and Sour Grapes

Last year, you’ll recall Maine became the first state in the nation to experiment with ranked choice voting. Full disclaimer: I’m in complete favor of the approach. All the arguments against it that I’ve seen so far are nothing more than hot air spoken by people who either don’t fully understand the concept (and choose not to enlighten themselves) or seem to be doing their best to make other people unable to fully understand the concept.

To illustrate, I present to you Exhibit A: Bruce Poliquin, the Republican Congressman who lost his seat last year because of Ranked Choice Voting. He’s making the rounds now, decrying the format because it “robbed” him of the election. Oh wait. I mean, because it robbed the voters of the election.

In Poliquin’s account to the Massachusetts Joint Committee on Election Laws, “on Election Day 2018, I won my second re-election by receiving 2,200 more votes than any of my three liberal opponents, one Democrat and two Independents.”

Poliquin, though, didn’t win.

That initial, first-round count on Election Night wasn’t the final word, because Maine voters in 2016 and again in June 2018 adopted ranked-choice voting. The process requires election officials to add in the second- or third-place choices of voters whose first pick came up short.

Poliquin said the backers of independents Tiffany Bond and Will Hoar essentially “got another bite of the apple” when their votes were redistributed between the two leaders in the race, as the law mandates.

In effect, he said, “those voters who cast their primary ballots for the two candidates who least represent” the values of the district “ended up choosing the rank-vote winner. Very misguided and unfair.”

To me, this is like a football team being upset because they were ahead at halftime, and yet the other team was allowed to come out and play in the second half. That team “got another bite of the apple” when their points were counted in the second half.

Ranked Choice Voting was decided by the voters. (Multiple times!) The rules were plain as day well in advance of the election. The election then ran according to those rules. And then suddenly when it didn’t go the way he wanted to, it’s a travesty?

Let’s try basketball, instead. Up until 1979, the NBA didn’t have 3 pointers. All shots counted for 2 points. In 1979, that rule changed. Suddenly, shots a certain distance from the basket counted for more points. That was the new rule of the game. If a team were to object to losing by a few points “because those three point shots shouldn’t count for three points,” what are you supposed to tell them?

The rules changed, buddy. Move on. It doesn’t make anyone’s vote more powerful than anyone else’s. It makes it so that you can vote for who you want to vote for and not have to worry that your vote is ultimately wasted in a political climate dominated by two parties. It makes it so independents can more effectively woo voters, who know they can vote for them without making it so the person they want least to be elected gets elected because that person’s opponents split the vote.

Poliquin’s out there trying to paint it like this was such chaos. Like the entire thing was a disaster, and Mainers are all up in arms about it. It’s true that I’ve talked to about three people (total) out of all of my friends who didn’t like it. But (though this may be hard to believe) I’ve got way more than three friends. It wasn’t chaos. It ran as expected. If you really wanted Poliquin elected, you maybe object because the person you wanted to win, didn’t.

Sour grapes, people. Ranked choice voting was wonderful. I hope the whole country follows suit.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Like what you’ve read? Please consider supporting me on Patreon. Thanks to all my Patrons who support me! It only takes a minute or two, and then it’s automatic from there on out. I’ve posted the entirety of my book ICHABOD in installments, and I’m now putting up chapters from PAWN OF THE DEAD, another of my unreleased books. Where else are you going to get the undead and muppets all in the same YA package? Check it out.

If you’d rather not sign up for Patreon, you can also support the site by clicking the MEMORY THIEF Amazon link on the right of the page. That will take you to Amazon, where you can buy my books or anything else. During that visit, a portion of your purchase will go to me. It won’t cost you anything extra.

%d bloggers like this: